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TIME TO MAKE THE DONUTS … plus … THE HUBBUB OVER DATE RAPE, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, AND OTHER GANGSTA-ISMS: ASKING THE QUESTION PEOPLE ARE THINKING ABOUT BUT ARE AFRAID TO ASK

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By DAN VALENTI

PLANET VALENTI News and Commentary

Don’t forget to tune in tonight for another thrill-packed adventure of PLANET VALENTI TELEVISION. We will mop the floor with The MOP and perform other astounding feats. Channel 16, tonight, live, 7 to 8 p.m. Replays Friday at 11:30 a.m., 3 p.m., 6:30 p.m., and 11 p.m. and on YouTube search “Planet Valenti TV.

(FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE, THURSDAY, SEPT. 18, 2014, 2014) — It’s time to make the donuts again. The Diocese of Springfield is paying taxes on the 2.6-acre St. Mary‘s campus on Tyler Street, but it doesn’t appear to be the commercial rate. Is there a hybrid classification for defrocked churches? In any case, it would appear virtually certain that the new Dunkin Donuts proposed for that location will pay considerably more in taxes, at the full and ruinous business rate of $35.17/thousand, a rate that keeps many businesses from even so much as sniffing around Pittsfield.

As for that particular location, several commentators to THE PLANET mentioned other spots for a Dunking Donuts, the former Hess station being one of them. We hear, however, that Cafua Management does not find that location viable for both the shape and size of the lot as well as concerns about gasoline, oil, lubricants, and other automotive chemicals that may be on the site.

In addition, THE PLANET was told that the developer wants to locate on the other side of Tyler Street. It may not seem like a big deal which side of the street the restaurant is located, but traffic studies show that during morning drive time, more traffic heads west into Pittsfield from the Dalton-Cheshire area than travels south toward Berkshire Crossing. When you consider that coffee is Dunkin Donuts’ most profitable staple with the highest markup (donuts only comprise about 20% of sales), the easiest to make in quantity, and the quickest to serve, the consideration makes sense. Over a 365-day year, that additional traffic on working days adds up.

The best alternate location we heard of was the former Burger King on Merrill Road. Sources tell THE PLANET that Cafua Management looked into that location but quickly backed off after meeting resistance from the Bianchi Administration. We weren’t told anything more than that and have no other details. If this is true, it would make one wonder why? What reason could there be for that type of anti-business attitude, again if true? You can make up your own answer, because, as you know, The Mayor of Pittsfield (The MOP) doesn’t return our requests for comment.

Some have asked why Cafua would want to locate multiple DD shops in proximity of one another? The answer seems to be found in “clustering,” a marketing strategy which essentially believes there is strength in numbers. If Cafua owns all the franchises, it is not in competition. You can be sure the company’s internal demographics support the locations.

——– 000 ——–

Is it a black thing? THE PLANET dares ask

We know about Ray Rice, the elevator, Janay, and Goodell. We continue to glide through Adrian Peterson, the switch, and the “he’s out, he’s in, he’s back out” policy of the Minnesota Vikings toward their star player. Prior to that, there was Ray Lewis and a long line of others. Now comes word of  the latest escapade of Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston, reigning Heisman Trophy winner and star of the #1 ranked Seminoles.

Last year, Winston came under investigation in connection with an alleged rape of a female Florida State student.  The D.A. eventually dropped the charges. In 2012, police questioned Winston and other Seminole football players following gun play involving BB guns. Then he was, according to Sports Illustrated, “implicated” in an alleged theft of soda at a local Burger King. This spring, the QB was cited in connection with a shoplifting incident at a Publix supermarket.

That’s what you call running the naked bootleg. Yesterday, we learned the latest stunt pulled by this paragon of virtue.

According to Yahoo! Sports, “Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston stood on a table and yelled “fuck her right in the pussy” on campus [Tuesday], according to a bunch of students who saw him. For the unaware, “Fuck her right in the pussy” was a fake video that turned into a meme, with a few people shouting it on live news broadcasts. It is now dead, because Jameis Winston climbed onto a table and yelled it.”

[EDITOR’S NOTE: A “meme” is an aspect of a society, usually involving a certain type of behavior, that passes quickly from one person to another. The Internet creates memes as a matter of routine, once again proving that the younger generation is imitative rather than creative, imitation and copy-catting being the most common way something “goes viral.”]

“Fuck her right in the pussy.”

“Twenty-three skidoo” and “Hell no we won’t go” apparently don’t satisfy the gutter mentalities of the scholars of Generation Y, who rushed their thumbs in defense of Winston, basically tweeting that it was “no big deal.” Many of these defenders of Sir James were women. After this latest incident, the university announced Winston will be suspended for the first half of Saturday’s home game versus Clemson.

Connects and Disconnects

Is THE PLANET the only one to see a major disconnect here, especially in light of the Ray Rice case, the spotlight on domestic violence, and how the topics of date rape and even sexuality in general are being blown out of proportion on college campuses and in the boring discourse of “experts”? For example, on dates, the new wisdom is “‘No’ means no, but ‘yes’ doesn’t always mean yes.” You explain to me how young men and women, in the throes of the harmonious wonder and delight of sex, are supposed to wade through all this in the heat of the moment? Also, does it not set up a boatload of allegations from those who, the morning after, have regrets about their actions the night before? “She consented” may no longer be enough. Signed and notarized affidavits may be required.

And can anyone except THE PLANET and Tom Townshend see a connection between this type of violent and nihilistic behavior and hip-hop? Is the effect of a too-much-too-long-too-loud gangsta’ world view now showing up in sports that are primarily black? Has that cesspool masking as “music” finally begun to work its way into the NFL (70% black) and the NBA (77% black)? (By comparison, only 8% of major league baseball players are black and the National Hockey League has less than 3% — sports that, anecdotally at least, seem relatively immune from the type of violent behavior now on routine display in the NFL and NBA.)

[THE PLANET at this point interjects this latest news from the NFL. Jonathan Dwyer, a running back for the Arizona Cardinals, was arrested yesterday and charged with two incidents of aggravated assault. The team then banned Dwyer from all team activities. Dwyer is black. The alleged incidents, Phoenix police say, involve Dwyer’s wife and his year-and-a-half old baby. Meanwhile, Ray McDonald, a defensive lineman for the San Francisco 49ers, has a hearing coming up on charges of domestic violence. Greg Hardy, a defensive lineman for the Carolina Panthers, was convicted of domestic assault in July. The Panthers only yesterday banished Hardy from the team. The 49ers have allowed McDonald to continue to practice and play. The lietenant governor of California has publicly pressured the 49ers to bench or suspend McDonald. Both McDonald and Hardy are  black.]

Townshend notes that hip hop and rap are not the same. Rap featured more poetics and addressed topics such as the search for love, but, “Townshend writes, “hip hop is different.”

How so? Townshend explains:

“It’s not a comfortable thing to admit, because there are those on the religious right in America who harbour an anti-hip hop agenda which simply equates to racism. We are not and never will be on their side. But because hip hop is so much more than a musical style, more enduring than a pop fad, and more inextricably entwined with a generation’s identity than anything that’s gone before or since, then it is different. And because of its reach, endurance and influence it could, dare we say it, be dangerous.

“Let’s talk about gangsta rap – the graphic, profane and violent sub-genre that sprang up during the so-called golden age of mid-80s hip hop.

“Seen as a potential threat even then, one of its pioneers, the former pimp and bank robber Ice-T likened gangsta rap to cowboy movies – a fantasy world of outlaws and rough justice. And yet its proponents were demonised for glorifying the same violence a previous generation of schoolchildren had grown up enjoying at the Saturday morning pictures.

Ice-T had a point, but the Old West as depicted in the films was a mythologised version of America’s brutal past. When gangsta rap crossed the line was when it became a self-perpetuating, self-mythologising version of America’s brutal present.

“The audience for a John Wayne western weren’t leaving the cinema and drawing a Colt .45 on a redskin. But the hip hop audience were and are gunning each other down in the same gang-blighted neighbourhoods immortalized in the tracks they’re listening to.

“Any socio-political motive in the music of early instigators N.W.A or Boogie Down Productions was quickly buried in the clamour for commercial success. The records got nastier and sales went higher.

“Gangsta rap may have started life on the streets of Compton, but it was repackaged and marketed to the summer houses of The Hamptons. Genuine social ills were now entertainment for the masses and the upper classes. For those on the street it was real, for those up above it was escapism – and both were buying it by the millions.

“If hip hop really has degraded society then this is where the rot began – by making heroes out of killers, pimps and hustlers, by perpetuating the worst aspects of the failing American social housing program, and by normalising the language of brutality, revenge and murder.

“Mainstream, million-selling, monosyllabic, money-obsessed hip hop still dominates the charts over there and over here. And in 25 years it hasn’t moved far from the gangsta blueprint. It’s still sexist, homophobic, in thrall to the criminal lifestyle and as dumb as a bag of hammers.

“And while the violence may have faded into the background in the wake of Tupac and Biggie‘s murders (not such a fantasy world then, Mr T), it’s still there. Lyrically you’re never far from a threat, a challenge or a gun reference. Metaphors they may be but try telling that to a kid who never went to school and still faces the reality of that violence every day.

“Gangsta simply got rebranded as bling, and now hip hop glorifies grotesque displays of material wealth above everything. Get rich or die trying? What kind of a mantra is that for a generation with very little chance of the former and a high statistical chance of the latter?

“The figureheads of hip hop are now multi-millionaires who either exploit and revel in their criminal back-story (how many times have we been reminded that Jay-Z is a former dealer?) or make up for a sheltered background by behaving as if they’re defending the honour of The Crips whenever the opportunity arises.

“Hey Kanye, hey Drake, hey Chris Brown – you aren’t in a gang, get over it.

“The predominant message of the most popular, ubiquitous and influential genre of music in the world is that the thug is king, that money is god, that violence is acceptable, that women are to be disrespected, that gay people are to be insulted, and that a criminal record is a badge of honour.

“Can we honestly still believe that hasn’t had a detrimental effect on our lives?”

——– 000 ——–

Considering the preponderance of the “gangsta'” mentality and hip hop in the locker room of the NFL and the NBA, can we know state with assurance the causal connection between this type of “entertainment” and athletes like Ray Rice and Jameis Winston?

Is it a black thing? We don’t make the statement. We only ask the question. What do you think, folks?

—————————————————————————————-

“Home, home and dry. Like a homing bird I’ll fly as a bird on wings.”The Beatles, “Free as a Bird” (1995).

“OPEN THE WINDOW, AUNT MILLIE.”

LOVE TO ALL.

 

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Ron Kitterman
Ron Kitterman
6 years ago

You spiked it, Gnarly, Dude. You don’t suppose there is any pressure on the prosecutors to drop or go lightly on these charges, on these larger than life mentors in the NFL,NBA or so called entertainment industry do you ?

dusty
dusty
6 years ago

I don’t know if Bianchi could discourage CAFU management from setting up anywhere. They seem pretty dogged and might roll right over him.

But curiously enough, Starbucks, which is an even bigger franchise, has only one location in the county that I know of and that is in Target at the Berkshire mall. I know that they are mainly west coast but they are trying to expand eastward. I wonder if they have ever tried to get into Pittsfield and what was their reception.

downtown dweller
downtown dweller
Reply to  dusty
6 years ago

Isn’t there also a Starbucks in Barnes & Noble? I’m not a coffee person so I don’t really keep track of where they are but one had been located there.

BOC
BOC
Reply to  dusty
6 years ago

There is a Starbucks at Berkshire Crossing as well as inside B&N. Starbucks is very present on the east coast, there may be one on every corner in NYC! I just don’t think the demographics of Pittsfield calls for more than what is already here.

Downtown Dweller
Downtown Dweller
Reply to  BOC
6 years ago

You’re right…I forgot about the one next to the Verizon store.

Thomas More
Thomas More
6 years ago

I tended to agree wit the planet in the beginning but after reading a few of the comments from our elected officials I guess I have to back off. Tricia Farley was had a good idea by building something with good paying jobs there that would promote a healthy lifestyle. What’s wrong with that? Lisa Tully said 99% of the people she talked with are against it. Maybe she should try running the drug re-hab idea by them. I’ll bet they’d go for that. Morandi hit it right on the nose when he said that putting a DD there would send the wrong message’. What would the right message be Kev? Why are Carr Hardware and the Beacon interested?

Downtown Dweller
Downtown Dweller
Reply to  Thomas More
6 years ago

The houses mentioned in the Eagle article which I believe you’re referring to as drug rehab are for individuals who’ve already gone through rehab and are transitioning back into the community. I live near one of them and they’re actually very good neighbors…they keep the property neat and tidy (picking up the litter that others are dropping) and there isn’t the “drama” that I hear from some of the other properties in the area (none of the fighting, yelling, etc.)

I don’t know what the city councilors would like to see at that site. I’ve seen pieces on television and on-line where individuals have turned buildings like churches into some interesting businesses and sometimes homes. I don’t think we really need another Dunkin Donuts (or a pizza place to respond to your comment from yesterday.) I wish we had more creative thinkers for putting the buildings to use that would get them back on the tax rolls or, if the buildings must come down, provide something other than part-time minimum wage jobs.

Bill
Bill
Reply to  danvalenti
6 years ago

Dan, Perfectly Put Paragraph

MrG1188
MrG1188
6 years ago

Who is Tom Townsend? I have been troubled by the hip hop attitude toward women for years. Disrespect is the best it offers.

2 for the show
2 for the show
6 years ago

When Elvis was rising in popularity, Ed Sullivan refused to have him on because of the hip shaking moves he did on stage were at the time repulsive. He only did so because of the extreme popularity of his #1 hits but he never liked him personally.

The Beatles started off in this country with a squeaky clean image due to their management. However in the course of time people like Art Linkletter blamed the death of his child and the decline of society on them. Charles Manson’s girls use of Helter Skelter and other lyrics, writing them in blood from their victims on the wall did not help. However, their rise to the top was not based on violence.

They went through many phazes in the creation of music but if there was an overall theme to their body of work it was: Love.

Rap and hip hop while interesting at first does seem to have decended to an overall theme: Sex and Violence. I am somewhat surprised that it has lasted as long as it has.

Society has changed dramatically and not for the better. Kids are raised on psychotopic drugs with absolutely no dicipline. Emphasis is on making lots of money. Minimum wage jobs don’t cut it and high profits of dealing drugs make it seem like the way to go. Political leaders, sports figures and Hollywood stars all make sex and violence seem normal. I think the problem goes much deeper than what the kids are listening to.

As each generation passes, society spirals further and further toward de basement. Makes Elvis’ hip shaking seem tame at best. A society that once had morals, now has none. Generation Z, should prove to be truly a zombie apocolypse.

Rome was never conquered – it fell apart. Due primarily to a breakdown in family, morals and corruption.

BOC
BOC
6 years ago

One major driving force behind the off the field violence in sports is that these spoiled athletes have gotten away with these things ever since some coach or school or town labeled them as stars in their youth. Then all the unearned privileges were bestowed upon them, including having violent and other criminal acts swept under the rug and covered up. So why would anyone expect their behavior to change when they’ve been constantly rewarded througout their lives for such behavior? The only reason any of this is being addressed at all, by anyone, is because it became publicized. And it’s about time – they’ve all gotten away with this sh!t way too long.

Jonathan Melle
Jonathan Melle
6 years ago

News Article:
“Pittsfield mayor taps Ken Demers as new head of BerkshireWorks”
Berkshire Eagle Staff, 9/18/2014

PITTSFIELD — Pittsfield Mayor Daniel L. Bianchi has announced that Ken Demers will be the new executive director of BerkshireWorks Career Center beginning Monday.

Demers was selected for his background in workforce development, collaborative mentality and innovative approach to developing new programs and identifying funding streams, according to a release by the mayor’s office.

He fills the position left open following the resignation in May of William Monterosso, who had been the subject of an investigation since being placed on paid administrative leave in April. City officials have not elaborated on the reason for the investigation.

Demers’ work experience includes a start in the Berkshire Learning Center, in which he supervised staff and implemented state regulated curriculum along with crisis intervention programs. He went on to work for the Corporation for Public Management in Springfield, where he is currently vice president of employment and training.

He is also vice president of shelter and housing for the New England Farm Workers’ Council, an affiliate organization of Partners for Community, through which he has expanded homeless shelters for families in the Springfield and Holyoke.

This story will be updated.

Ed McClelland
Ed McClelland
Reply to  Jonathan Melle
6 years ago

Congratulations to Mr, Demers and Mayor Bianchi. May Berkshireworks thrive under their tutelage, Again, wondering why no qualified Berkshire County applicants were considered. Is Mr, Demers going to commute from out of state in CT ?

dusty
dusty
Reply to  Ed McClelland
6 years ago

and did he really meet all the qualifications set forth by the mayor?

I think one of his first duties should be to read the Dan Valenti blog going back two years. It is a great primer for working for the city. In fact it should be required reading for all electable candidates as well.

Jonathan Melle
Jonathan Melle
Reply to  Jonathan Melle
6 years ago

“Bianchi Names New Berkshire Works Director”
iBerkshires, Staff Reports, September 18, 2014

PITTSFIELD, Massachusetts — Mayor Daniel Bianchi named Ken Demers the new executive director of BerkshireWorks.

Demers replaces William Monterosso, who left the job just a few months in earlier this year. Prior to that, John Barrett III headed the organization.

Demers is the current vice president of employment and training for the Corporation for Public Management in Springfield. There he is tasked with marketing the organization’s employment and training capabilities and maintaining the budget, staffing and day to day operations.

He is also the vice president of shelter and housing for the New England Farm Workers’ Council. Demers started his career in the Berkshire Learning Center.

According to Bianchi’s office, “Demers was chosen due to his background in workforce development, collaborative mentality and innovative approach to developing new programs and identifying funding streams.” He takes over the position on September 22, 2014.

http://www.iberkshires.com/story/47481/Bianchi-Names-New-Berkshire-Works-Director.html?source=top_stories

Winchester 73
Winchester 73
6 years ago

The argument that we don’t need another DD I’m not buying. The developer as DV pints out (and its a crucial point) is coming in with his own money. No handouts. Taking the risk. The developer is the one betting on the market not the taxpayers.
The interest of Carr and which Mr. Moore brought up is also curious. When I put it together that the city discouraged the Burger King site plus all the “sudden interest” out of the blue in the property by TFB, Krol, Morandi, etc. it doesn’t pass the smell test.
Finally, agree totally about connection between the filthy brand of gangta hihop and the problems we are seeing in NFL,NBA, and with youth.

Spider
Spider
Reply to  Winchester 73
6 years ago

You say “the developer is coming in with his own money….taking the risk”. But the developer is very wealthy and what risk is he really taking. If he fails, he simply closes the business and leaves empty buildings behind. And has a write off on his income taxes. We are the losers…..not DD.

Downtown Dweller
Downtown Dweller
6 years ago

Opposition to Dunkin’ Donuts plan to raze St. Mary the Morning Star Church grows
By Jim Therrien, Berkshire Eagle Staff,

PITTSFIELD — Opposition to razing the former St. Mary the Morning Star Church for a Dunkin’ Donuts restaurant continues to intensify, with hundreds more signing an online petition.

In addition, other protest initiatives include plans by downtown businesses to show support, television news coverage, and letters to The Eagle and the Catholic Diocese of Springfield, which owns the decommissioned church and adjacent buildings off Tyler Street.

Darcie Sosa, one of those leading the Save St. Mary’s campaign, said Wednesday that more than 1,000 people now have signed her online petition, which is posted at Change.org.

“It has been a very busy day,” said Sosa, who with others met with TV news crews from the Albany, N.Y., area at the church to explain their objections to razing the brick church at 653 Tyler St.

Sosa said she also heard from the owners of Carr Hardware and the Beacon Cinema, who offered to help support the campaign. And Sosa said she is exploring the option of working with an attorney experienced in similar battles to save historic structures.

While the church is not on state or federal historic preservation listings, Sosa and others have said they consider it historically significant to the city and a sound and beautiful structure. The church was closed in 2008 by the diocese and has been for sale.

The city’s Historical Commission also has offered to take comments from the public on the church at its next meeting at 5:15 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 7 at City Hall.
Cafua Management Co. last week proposed a Dunkin’ Donuts with a drive-thru operation at the site and proposes to demolish the church, a former rectory building and later a former convent on the 2.6-acre former church campus.

The proposal requires site plan review by the city Community Development Board and a special permit for the drive thru from the City Council, requiring 8 of 11 councilors to vote in favor.

Cafua, which has other Dunkin’ Donuts restaurants in the city, also proposed a restaurant and drive thru last year at First and Fenn streets. However, the council rejected a permit for the drive thru, and the decision has been appealed by Cafua to Massachusetts Land Court.

Paul Supranowicz, a contractor and owner of Custom Restorations, is among those who have suggested alternative uses for the church property. He said he approached the diocese about 18 months ago concerning the rectory and convent buildings.

Supranowicz has created shared living space in houses on First and Second streets for people who have gone through substance abuse rehabilitation and are good candidates for overcoming their addictions. He said he considered converting the rectory and possibly the former convent for such a use, and believed that in time uses for the former church would likely become evident.

The convent and rectory buildings would require few changes for the use he proposed, Supranowicz said, “and down the road the church absolutely could be leased for a number of different things.”

Ward 1 City Councilor Lisa Tully, in whose ward the property is located, and Ward 2 Councilor Kevin Morandi, whose ward abuts it, both said they would oppose the Dunkin’ Donuts plan at this point.

Morandi said he believes the fast-food doughnut shop would send the wrong message, especially considering a focus on pedestrian-oriented businesses by city officials. He said he doesn’t see the restaurant “adding any value to the neighborhood.”

Tully said Wednesday that “ninety-nine percent of the people” she has talked to about the proposal are opposed. She said she continues to research all aspects of the project and uses for the church site, but added, “The way I look at it, the people come first, and they are against it.”

State Rep. Tricia Farley-Bouvier, D-Pittsfield, has also spoken out against the Dunkin’ plan. She said Wednesday, “I don’t think this project will bring any value to the neighborhood, or the city at large.”

A fast-food restaurant does not promote a healthy lifestyle, she said, and won’t bring good-paying jobs for residents.

Former city Director of Administrative Services Mary McGinnis said Wednesday she has written to Bishop Mitchell T. Rozanski, urging him to consider Supranowicz’s proposal for housing for individuals emerging from substance abuse rehabilitation and to reject the Dunkin’ Donuts proposal.

A longtime nurse with Berkshire Health Systems, McGinnis said she has seen a significant need for such housing, having worked at the McGee detoxification unit in Pittsfield.

“Our city is in need of emergent housing for those who have gone through the process of alcohol and drug detoxification and want to continue as productive citizens in a safe and supportive environment,” McGinnis said in her letter. “Many of the patients I take care of need immediate housing after discharge, some are actually homeless and have given up.”

http://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/ci_26557159/opposition-dunkin-donuts-at-pittsfield-church-site-grows

DowagerHat
DowagerHat
6 years ago

I find it ironic that while the Planet posts regarding domestic violence in the NFL, here in our fair city this evening men in Red High Heels will Walk a Mile in “Her Shoes”. It seems to be an oxymoron. As a victim of domestic violence i find this insulting. My shoes are not red and don’t sparkle, nor are they high. Even among our “finest” lurk those protected by the “blue code of silence”. Domestic violence will only be stopped when we teach our sons the respect for women, beginning with their mothers.

Wilson
Wilson
Reply to  DowagerHat
6 years ago

Women and mothers have to be respectable first, teaching kids facts contrary to reality gets you nowhere. 99 out 100 “victims of domestic violence” neglect to mention that they are also perpetrators.

DowagerHat
DowagerHat
Reply to  Wilson
6 years ago

Blame the Victim Wilson. Post your real name you coward. You’re a part of the problem.

Pat
Pat
Reply to  DowagerHat
6 years ago

Due to the breakdown of the family, many men aren’t even raised by their mothers. I believe mothers teach their sons to respect women if they do their job properly. Our current culture claims to support women, but in reality it’s just a lot of talk. Truly supporting women would mean respecting all women regardless of their economic status in society.

Even more important than the NFL controversies, however, is the group ISIS and their horrific agenda. They have no respect for women or children. They do not tolerate Christians and have already killed many of them in Iraq. Australia police rounded up a large group of them who were planning to kidnap people off the streets and behead them. Several have been apprehended coming over our unsecured borders. Where is the concern about this from Americans? Are we all sleeping?

Shakes His Head
Shakes His Head
Reply to  Pat
6 years ago

Arming the Kurds, a culture equally despicable in terms of human rights violations and religious extremism, seems foolhardy.

Scott
Scott
Reply to  DowagerHat
6 years ago

I agree one doesn’t need to walk around in high heals to be empathetic to woman who are abused. @ Wilson what the heck are you talking about?

Scott
Scott
Reply to  danvalenti
6 years ago

You’re right Dan what a bunch of tools I mean ok the cause is great and it certainly draws attention but give me a freak’n break. I think you may be onto something in regards to the photo op. I don’t a DA walking a mile in red high heals I want a hard nosed legal expert who holds actual offenders accountable. The feminist love crap like this they eat it up all day. I would however wear a shirt and walk a mile that stated “men who abuse woman and children are cowards, come take a swing at me!@

Nota
Nota
6 years ago

T E S should be considered for N F L Commisioner.

ed shepardson
ed shepardson
6 years ago

I wonder what the victims of pedophile priests might have to say about the demolition of a Roman Catholic Church? Certainly abuses, or worse, cover ups occurred at St. Mary’s. To some a church is a sanctuary. To the victims, the church might be a prison. Demolition might give them some closure.

Kevin
Kevin
Reply to  ed shepardson
6 years ago

Funny Ed but I was thinking along the same lines myself. For that group of victims the demolition represents a sort of victory.

chuck garivaltis
chuck garivaltis
6 years ago

Dan

It is not often your numerous audience can correct you in anything but my heritage must speak up this one time. It was Athena, not Venus, who sprang (birth) out of the head of Zeus fully clothed and armed to seek her place on Mount Olympus.

amandaWell
amandaWell
6 years ago

great Chuck, that, along with a PVTV repeat tonight is mediocre news day.

Scott
Scott
6 years ago

Have you listened to any country music lately they’re starting to project the same ingnorant idealology. It’s not a black or white thing anymore. “It” has bridged the gap and crossed racial boundaries.

PopKornSutton
PopKornSutton
6 years ago

Remember the movie The Longest Yard? Where Inmates played the officers? Who would have thought the N F L has a real life league of felons that play every Sunday on Natonal TV